Inside the Mind of a Kindergartner

Pictured outside the calm classroom, Tyler Belding, Hayes Gatlin, Sydney Montgomery, Isabel Stolarczyk, and Kloe Roth pose in front of the Kindergarten board.

Pictured outside the calm classroom, Tyler Belding, Hayes Gatlin, Sydney Montgomery, Isabel Stolarczyk, and Kloe Roth pose in front of the Kindergarten board.

Amy Patterson, Section Editor

“Kindergarten”, when literally translated from its German roots, means “children’s garden”. Much like a plant garden, kindergarten is a place for growth, nourishment, and sunshine. Truly, the year a child attends kindergarten is the last year that welcomes unrestricted thought and flourishing creativity. Concepts of time and quantity are lost upon innocent kindergarten minds.

This was demonstrated to me in the most hilarious of ways.

After an assembly featuring Miles, the mascot for the Bronco Denvers, Columbine pupils bounced off the walls with excitement. Despite the calamity, the five kindergartners from Mrs. Ashli Schultz’s class who were interviewed were peaceful and attentive, in stark contrast to the environment around them. The younger students, surprisingly, seemed to possess more self-control than their elders.

Squeezing into a diminutive chair, I bent to the level of five Columbine Elementary kindergarteners to embark on an epic quest to discover exactly what occurs inside the mind of a kindergartner.

“What’s your name?” I asked the smallest of the children in front of me.

“Tyler Belding!” answered the little boy, with huge brown eyes and a smile.

“Could you tell me how to spell that?”

The boy got halfway through before muttering, “Oh, I forget.”

“Tyler, how old do you think I am?”

“Six.”

At least when I’m forty, they’ll think I’m twenty-two. The same question was asked of Sydney Montgomery, who appeared overwhelmed by the situation.

“I think six, too,” the girl mumbled.

Kloe Roth, a bundle of blonde, contested this point vehemently. “No, no, no!” she declared, “She’s older than six. I think she’s…” Kloe leered up at the ceiling in thought. “Seven.”

The group, after a moment of discussion, agreed that the proper estimation was indeed seven.

Upon being asked about the holidays, the squirts could hardly contain their enthusiasm. “Christmas is my favorite,” exclaimed Isabel Stolarcyzk. “I really want a baby doll. Last year, I got a makeup set.”

“I want a Nerf gun,” confessed a quiet boy named Hayes Gatlin. “That would be the best gift.”

When given the opportunity to share thoughts without prompt, the youngsters had a plethora to appropriate.

“I can run farther than Hayes, but it’s not his fault,” asserted Tyler Belding. “It’s ‘cause I have faster shoes.” The boy beamed down at his tiny shoes in glee.

Kloe Roth glanced up at me from the floor. “I love cookies. Chocolate chip cookies!”

Within a few years, each one of these children will be conditioned to “sit down and shut up”. Soon, they will be told to stop drawing and start writing. Soon, they will be asked to learn how to be an adult at a pace which may, at times, seem blindingly fast.

For now, it is best to simply explore inside the mind of a kindergartner.

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